“April Showers Bring May Flowers”

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Transitioning from April to May was great for I Will Survive, Inc. We had our amazing #IWSribboncuttingceremony on April 18, 2015 and Mayor Pittman proclaimed the day to now be known as the “I Will Survive” day. What an honor to all those who are battling breast cancer and all those who survived. Mothers, fathers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, brothers, daughters, sons… a special moment to honor those who lost the fight against breast cancer as well. Karen Palmer, was born on April 18, 1952 and gave birth to 5 children before the tender age of 38 when she had a final lung failure due to the malignant tumor spreading.

Rain was in the forecast and our new building (donated for one year) was not large enough to bring everyone inside for the ceremony. We opened with Pastor Cail and the rain moved out of the clouds. God shed light through the rays of the sun and the gloomy day became bright. It was a joyous day. $523 dollars was raised to help fund our programs and we hope to have our Office Manager and Receptionist hired soon to help us run our programs out of a building we can now call home.

Show your mothers love, not only on Mother’s day coming up, but cherish them everyday. We do not know how long they have on this earth. Kiss them, hug them, tell them that you love them, and appreciate them. For I, Anisa Palmer, founder of I Will Survive, Inc., nonprofit organization for breast cancer awareness through education and funding in lower-income communities, wish that I spent more time doing that in the short amount of years that I had my dear mother, Karen Palmer, by my side.

And rain on our future mothers so they can blossom into magnificent women. Inspire them to be community leaders and women of virtue. Give them knowledge to help them succeed. Mentor them. Teach them. Lead them. And support them as we continue to “Support the Fighters”.

The Latest on Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

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I Will Survive, Inc:

Share research and knowledge with others!

Originally posted on Breast Cancer Authority:

Lastest Research on Vitamin D and Breast CancerBy: Rachel Pappas, Breast Cancer Survivor and Founder of www.1UpOnCancer.com.

The link between Vitamin D deficiency, breast cancer, and breast cancer recurrence is not new. But now Vitamin D has actually been shown to kill breast cancer cells.

I was so intrigued by what I read, I had to get on the phone with the clinical investigator myself, especially since I, and most of the women I know with breast cancer have a Vitamin D deficiency, and I hear it more and more.

JoEllen Welsh, PhD, a professor at GenNYsis Center for Excellence in Cancer Genomics in Albany, NY, has studied Vitamin D and breast cancer for 30 years, but for the first time, has incubated fresh human samples with Vitamin D. She took samples of early and late stage tumors, those with and without receptors for estrogen, progesterone, and HER2.

“Within days, half the cells shriveled and…

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Know Your Bs

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Dr. Deborah German, vice president for medical affairs, dean of UCF College of Medicine

Health Tip From The UCF College of Medicine

Know Your Bs

Ever reach for the B vitamins when you need an energy boost? Beyond being a great pick-me-up, the eight B vitamins -often sold as a B complex-work great as a team, as well as by themselves for specific needs.

*       B1 (Thiamin) helps the body produce new cells. It has the ability to protect the immune system and is necessary to break down simple carbohydrates.

*       B2 (Riboflavin) helps fight free radicals (cell damaging particles in the body) by working as an antioxidant. It is important for red blood cell production and may prevent early aging and the development of heart disease.

*       B3 (Niacin) boosts HDL cholesterol (the good kind). Studies find that niacin can help treat acne when ingested or used topically.

*       B5 (Pantothenic Acid) can be found in almost every food group. It breaks down fats and carbs for energy and is responsible for the production of certain sex and stress-related hormones, including testosterone. Research also suggests that B5 promotes healthy skin.

*       B6 (Pyridoxine) plays a major role in mood and sleep patterns by helping the body create serotonin, melatonin and norepinephrine (a stress hormone).

*       B7 (Biotin) receives lots of attention because it’s known for improving the health of hair, skin and nails. This B vitamin also is especially important during pregnancy because it is vital for the baby’s growth.

*       B9 (Folate) is another vital vitamin for pregnant women because it helps prevent neurological birth defects and supports the baby’s growth. Studies also suggest that folate may help with depression and prevent memory loss.

*       B12 (Cobalamin) plays a critical role in the production of red blood cells, as well as assists iron in doing its job of creating hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen

B vitamins are available in a multitude of forms at all drug stores. But before taking off-the-shelf vitamins, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend specific ones that your body may be lacking. And in some cases, high-dose amounts are even prescribed.

B, or any type of vitamin, can be harmful if taken in excess. So when in doubt, consult your physician. You can also add B-rich foods to your diet, like fish and dark leafy greens.

Weekly Health Tips are brought to you by UCF Health (formerly UCF Pegasus Health), the College of Medicine’s physician practice. Offering primary and specialty care under one roof, UCF Health treats patients age 16 and up and accepts most major insurance plans. Two locations are now open: the original in East Orlando at Quadrangle and University boulevards just blocks from the main UCF campus, and the newest one in Medical City at Narcoossee Road and Tavistock Lakes Boulevard. Information for both facilities can be found at UCFHealth.org, or call (407) 266-DOCS to schedule an appointment.

Reducing Radiation Damage With Ginger & Lemon Balm

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I Will Survive, Inc:

A reblog must!

Originally posted on Breast Cancer Authority:

Lemon Balm and Ginger Protect Against RadiatiopnBy: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

The German Medical Association finally just apologized for the profession’s role in the Nazi atrocities, 65 years after 20 physicians stood trial in Nuremberg. During the trial, the Nazi doctors argued that their experiments were not unlike previous studies by researchers in the United States, like Dr. Strong’s injection of prisoners with the plague. Nazi Docs were hung; Dr. Strong, went on to Harvard. And we were just getting started. The few examples the Nazis cited were nothing compared to what the American medical establishment started doing after Nuremburg. After all prisoners are much cheaper than chimpanzees.

Much attention has focused on our cold war radiation experiments, which remained classified for decades. Declassification, the American Energy Commission warned, they would have a very poor effect on the public, because they described…

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Free ultrasound breast screening offered to young black women in Connecticut

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I Will Survive, Inc:

Thank you for sharing this information and Keep on Surviving, with Love from Team Survive @ I Will Survive, Inc.

Originally posted on Me and Breast Cancer:

The Connecticut Breast Health Initiative has awarded a $33,350 grant to begin a five-year breast ultrasound screening study involving black women ages 25 to 39.

HERE IS THE ARTICLE I READ: http://www.middletownpress.com/health/20150302/free-ultrasound-breast-screening-offered-to-young-black-women-in-connecticut

The study is open to black women with and without family histories of breast cancer.

Women can get the screenings at two sites: the Medical Arts Center in Plainville adjacent to the Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute at the Hospital of Central Connecticut and the Imaging Center of West Hartford.

This is in response to the fact that young black women are at high risk of getting Triple Negative Breast Cancer. This is a super aggressive breast cancer.

OH AND MARCH THIRD IS NATIONAL TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER DAY!!!! SO SPREAD THE WORD!!!!!!!!!

Not to scare anyone but the article says: “For instance, 35 percent of black women develop breast cancer before the age of 40, compared to 20 percent…

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Diet & Exercise…There’s an App for That! #REPOST

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Submitted for: Dr. Deborah German, vice president for medical affairs, dean, UCF College of Medicine

Subject: Weekly Health Tip From The UCF College of Medicine

Diet & Exercise…There’s an App for That!

Smartphones have given us the ability to control much of our lives from a single device. So why not manage our health there, too?

According to Google, health and fitness has been the year’s fastest growing app category, with top download categories including “healthy eating,” “fitness/training” and “calorie counters.”

Certainly thousands of health and fitness apps exist, but it raises the big question: Do these apps really benefit the user? Answer: It depends.

A study conducted by the University of Massachusetts found that most apps are useful for planning and calculating nutrition, but they don’t help you change your behavior because they lack strategies for ways to help you “stick with” your healthy habits.

When you’re evaluating potential health apps, consider the following questions:

*       Can I personalize my app? If you cannot input data like height, weight, age, sex and exercise intensity level, then its recommendations will likely be off-target.

*     Does it utilize my phone’s features? The best apps tend to rely heavily on the phone’s built-in functions and features. For example, an exercise app might use your GPS and accelerometer to track your workout.

*       Is it connected to other apps? Since fitness isn’t about a single variable, the app shouldn’t be either. Consider apps that tie into others focused on diet, exercise, sleep, etc.

*       What are users saying? Read online user reviews and look for trends. If you discover that several people are saying the same things-good or bad-the likelihood that your experience will be similar is high.

*       Is it social? Many people find the ability to report progress on social networks like Facebook to be a great source of encouragement. You any even discover new support systems among your online friends.

Ultimately, to change your behavior you need to use apps-and all technology for that matter-in the right way. If you’re spending hours focused on your data, you’re probably not moving. You’re stuck behind a computer. Instead, use technology to help you keep accurate track of what you’re eating or how many miles you walk. Then use that data to set new, healthier goals.

UCF Health Medical Director, Dr. Maria Cannarozzi, often recommends My Fitness Pal to her patients. She likes it because it shows how many calories you’re putting in your mouth every day so you can make better food choices-and it’s free.

Like anything, it’s easy to get addicted to new toys like apps. Mary E. Pritchard, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Psychology at Boise State University, says you are in dangerous mental health waters if you find that not using your app gives you anxiety or withdrawal; you are spending more time using your app than you want to or intended; or you choose working with technology over other social activities.

The bottom line is to know your body and yourself. If a fitness app helps keep your exercise program on track, then go for it. However, remember that an app cannot improve your health and wellness until you make basic behavioral modifications like eating more nutritional foods and getting a recommended amount of exercise. Use technology to help you do what you can’t do on your own, like accurately count carbs or calories, to improve your overall health.

Weekly Health Tips are brought to you by UCF Health (formerly UCF Pegasus Health), the College of Medicine’s physician practice. UCF Health includes primary care doctors and specialists who treat patients age 16 and up from across the community and accept most major insurance plans. If you or someone you know needs medical care, call (407) 266-DOCS or visit UCFHealth.com for more information. Coming in March – UCF Health will open a second location in Lake Nona’s Medical City. Stay tuned for more details.

Back to Basics for Good Nutrition and Health #Repost

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Submitted for: Dr. Deborah German, vice president for medical affairs, dean, UCF College of Medicine

Subject: Weekly Health Tip From The UCF College of Medicine

Back to Basics for Good Nutrition and Health

Medical evidence suggests that 50 to 75 percent of suffering can be eliminated with a healthy diet. In fact, good nutrition can help those suffering with diseases like arthritis, boost your overall mood and outlook on life, and even improve your quality of sleep. However, there’s so much conflicting information about food that it’s hard to know what to eat these days.

When it comes to nutrition, it’s important to get back to basics:

*       Drink at least 64 ounces of water per day. This is essential for proper metabolism and optimal body function.

*       Include at least 25 to 30 grams of fiber in your diet daily.

*       Include about 46 to 56 grams of protein in your diet daily; more if you’re very active.

*       Incorporate resistant starches (healthy carbohydrates) like beans, brown rice and garbanzo beans, which serve to boost metabolism and burn fat.

While “superfoods” have been in the media lately, there is no medical definition. However, it has come to represent a category of foods that possess superior nutritional properties-from antioxidants and anti-inflammatories to cancer inhibitors and blood sugar regulators. Some of the “tried and true” superfoods to incorporate into your diet include:

*       Leafy greens and crucifers (broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale and collards)

*       Nuts (walnuts, almonds and pistachios)

*       Legumes (peanuts, lentils, black beans and garbanzo beans)

*       Whole grains (oats, brown rice and whole barley)

*       Super starches (sweet potatoes)

*       Fatty, cold-water fish (salmon, herring and sardines)

*       Fruits (berries, avocados, tomatoes, pears, grapefruit and bananas)

*       Tea (green and black varieties)

*       Dairy (Greek yogurt and eggs)

*       Other (pumpkin, beets, dark chocolate, cinnamon and soy)

There are several “trendy” superfoods getting lots of attention like nutrient-rich quinoa, which is packed with iron and is a nice balance of carbohydrates and proteins. Quinoa is almost like a balanced meal in itself. And since most American diets are deficit in protein, chia seeds and hemp seeds provide simple solutions. They can easily be added to soups, salads and cereals for an instant boost.

Regardless of your diet, nothing can replace healthy living… Eliminate all tobacco products; only consume alcohol in moderation; participate in 30 minutes of physical activity at least five times a week; get the appropriate amounts of sleep for your age; take time out for mindfulness, meditation and deep breathing; enjoy leisure and relaxation activities on a regular basis; and remain social.

Interested in learning more about how nutrition affects your heart health? UCF Health cardiologist Dr. Bernard Gros is offering a free seminar February 23 at 6:30 p.m. called “Your Healthy Heart: From Diet to Statins.” The seminar will be held at UCF Health, 3400 Quadrangle Blvd. Orlando, FL 32817. Space is limited, so registration is required. For more information and to register, visit www.ucfhealth.com

Weekly Health Tips are brought to you by UCF Health (formerly UCF Pegasus Health), the College of Medicine’s physician practice. UCF Health includes primary care doctors and specialists who treat patients age 16 and up from across the community and accept most major insurance plans. If you or someone you know needs medical care, call (407) 266-DOCS or visit UCFHealth.com for more information. Coming in March – UCF Health will open a second location in Lake Nona’s Medical City. Stay tuned for more details.