VA’s Commitment to Women Veterans

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MAY 18, 2017 AT 3:17 PM ET BY SECRETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS DAVID SHULKIN

As we celebrate Women’s Health Week, I am pleased to announce that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has adopted American Cancer Society (ACS) breast cancer screening guidelines that give women a choice to begin screening at age 40.

The guidelines also recommend starting yearly mammograms by age 45 and then every other year from age 55. The guidelines apply to women at average risk for breast cancer and complement VA’s already-extensive program for breast care for Veterans.

I believe it’s important for our women Veterans to know that they are in control of their care and the care they receive from VA is consistent with or exceeds care in the private sector. Adopting American Cancer Society standards gives Veterans further assurances that their care aligns with other health-care systems.

It’s worth drawing attention to a few other related facts:

  • All eligible women Veterans have access to mammograms either onsite or through care in the community;
  • Currently, 76 percent of women Veterans age 40-49 receive mammograms through VA.
  • VA quality scores from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS), show that women Veterans are much more likely to receive age-appropriate breast cancer screening than women in private sector health care;
  • In 2015, VA provided mammogram screenings to 86 percent of its women Veteran patients age 50-74, compared with the private sector at 73 percent; and
  • VA has established a state-of-the-art information technology Breast Cancer Registry (BCR). The BCR integrates data from several VA sources to provide comprehensive patient specific information about breast cancer screening, test results, past and current breast cancer treatment, and population surveillance of breast care (both in the community and within VA).

Our Acting VA Under Secretary for Health Dr. Poonam Alaigh said it perhaps best last week: “Engaging and better servicing the unique healthcare needs of our women Veterans is one of VA’s most important priorities. When it comes to their care, we want women Veterans to be in control of it every day and in every way.”

For more information about VA’s commitment to women Veterans, please visit https://www.va.gov/womenvet/ or call 855-VA-WOMEN (855-829-6636) for information about VA services and resources.

 

Read the original article here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2017/05/18/vas-commitment-women-veterans

 

A Night of Fashion!

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A Night of Fashion is an event you do not want to miss! Dress fashionable!

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You may have heard about the critical work we conduct at I Will Survive, Inc. If not, we are in approaching our 7th year of serving greater Atlanta area and putting on our annual charity event to raise $10,000 for our programs on Thursday, April 6, 2017 at the exquisite Callanwolde from 7:00pm to 9:30pm. We will include amazing local fashion designers, prevention education information, breast cancer resources, motivational speakers, fine art, incredible live music, a silent auction, delicious food, and drinks. Sponsors include the Fulton DeKalb Hospital Authority, Peach State Health Plan, I Care Atlanta, Unified Tech, Inc., Nationwide Soluntions, Inc. and more. Gift bag sponsors include Nekola Essentials, Livi Rae Lingerie, and more!

Silent Auction items include Macallan Rare Cask, Jack Daniels Sinatra Select, South African Safari, Tessa Marie Photography Sessions, Vixen Vodka Gift Basket, Shopping Spree’s, Luxury Dining Experiences, and more.

Actress Tangi Miller is your fabulous Host for the evening! Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green, Dr. Diana Woodruff, and Brenda Cobb are special Guest Speakers for the event. They will share their incredible stories and impact in our community on health. Recording Artist, Angelina Sherie is the featured artist for the event. Renee Knorr, international model and fashion guru, will host the fashion show portion of the event. You are in for an real treat!

The organization was founded in 2010 by military combat veteran, Anisa Palmer, who lost her mother to breast cancer. We provide economic support, prevention education, and health & wellness services to our community members affected by breast cancer.

Alarming facts: “One woman will die of breast cancer every 13 minutes in the U.S. and every 19 seconds, someone in the world is diagnosed with breast cancer.” Your contribution helps us in our life saving programs as we continue to “support the fighters” who are diagnosed with breast cancer and spread prevention tips and education to the communities. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Please reach the Executive Director, Anisa Palmer, for additional information if needed at Anisa.Palmer@IWillSurviveInc.org and be sure to visit us on the web and like our facebook page, connect with us on instagram, and follow us on twitter.#aNightofFashoin #IWillSurviveInc @IWillSurviveInc

We look forward to seeing you there and thank you for “supporting the fighters” of breast cancer.

Warmest regards,

Event Committee

http://www.IWillSurviveInc.org

Get tickets today! https://iwscharity2017.eventbrite.com

 

 

 

https://iwscharity2017.eventbrite.com

7 Things Every Mother Needs to Tell Her Daughter About Breast Cancer Prevention

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By Marnie Clark

Benjamin Franklin’s old saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is never more appropriate than when it comes to breast cancer prevention. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, at least 33 percent of breast cancer is preventable. Many natural health practitioners suspect that percentage is actually much higher. By simply adopting healthy lifestyle practices, it is estimated that you can bring that breast cancer prevention figure closer to 50 percent.

It is crucial to learn the things that can put women at higher risk for breast cancer. Not only do you want to avoid these risk factors, but also teach your daughters (and sisters and friends) about them. As a breast cancer coach, I always discuss these important breast cancer prevention tips with my clients.

7 Tips for Breast Cancer Prevention

  1. Better Nutrition Comes from Whole Foods and Organic Foods

A healthy diet that provides good nutrition is the foundation of having good health. It is critical to teach our children how to eat wholesome nutritious foods and avoid packaged, processed foods. The goal is to avoid or minimize sugar, and to get back to the basics of wonderfully prepared natural and organic whole foods including vegetables, fruits, grains, legumes, and high quality free-range animal foods. Our bodies were designed to operate optimally on a whole foods diet (not a processed foods diet) and certainly not on chicken nuggets, soft drinks, and French fries.

The need for everyone to eat organic produce is at an all-time high due to our fruits and vegetables being so highly sprayed with cancer-causing pesticides. Many foods are genetically modified and it is becoming increasingly clear that GMOs are not safe for us to consume. In addition, soil depletion is occurring, which yields crops that are lower in nutrients than what was being produced just a few decades ago.

Organically grown animal foods are also a much better choice because conventionally raised animals are being pumped full of hormones and antibiotics that are increasing the incidence of breast cancer. These factory farmed animals also eat a diet that is unnaturally high in foods (corn and soy) that promote inflammation (high in omega-6 fats) when we consume them. Choosing organic produce and animal foods (preferably pasture-raised because these animals are, for the most part, eating what nature intended them to eat and will be much lower in omega-6 fats) not only decreases your cancer risk, it is also much better for the planet.

  1. Avoid Toxic Cosmetics and Personal Care Products

Toxic chemicals are now present in just about everything we use in our homes and on our bodies, from dish washing liquid to eye shadow. These chemicals (and there are about 70,000 of them) are known hormone disrupters.

In addition to being toxic and carcinogenic, these substances can increase the estrogen load in the body over time and are difficult to detoxify through the liver. Called “xenoestrogens” (foreign estrogens), they mimic our body’s own estrogen and can alter hormone activity. Growing evidence implicates xenoestrogens in a wide range of human health problems, including breast cancer.

The easy solution is to use non-toxic or organic personal care products and cosmetics. It is important to know that the word “natural” on the label means almost nothing because the product can still contain toxic chemicals. It is best to look for organic certification on the label and to know what ingredients to watch out for. What goes on your skin gets in your bloodstream so it’s important to be proactive about this and to minimize toxic chemicals. What’s in your bloodstream can easily circulate throughout your body and into cells that create your hormones and organs.

Personally, I scrutinize every single thing I put on my body and I suggest you do as well. From nail polish (don’t use it) to hair spray to mascara. A good source of information to determine the relative safety (or dangers) of ingredients in personal care products and cosmetics is the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database.

  1. Move Your Body

The American Cancer Society estimates that half of all cancer deaths could be avoided by practicing healthy lifestyle habits such as simple exercise. Recent research tells us that obesity, especially in the middle-adult years, increases the risk of breast cancer.

It is important to teach your daughter an active lifestyle and it is best to lead by example. Take her hiking, skating, for long walks in parks, have her participate in sports, ballet, dancing. Whatever gets her moving and enjoying physical activity! Also, tell her why it is so important.

  1. Keep Your Cell Phone Away from Your Body and Out of Your Bra

Studies have determined that heavy use of cell phones increases the chance for brain tumors. Children are more vulnerable to electromagnetic frequencies because they have thinner skull bones and smaller heads. Their brain tissue also has a higher conductivity and this puts them at a higher risk.

Although there does not at present appear to be any studies which link breast cancer risk with cell phone use, I have seen too many women use their bras to hold their cell phones. As a cancer coach, I know of several women who tucked their cell phones into their bras and later developed breast cancer in that breast.

A doctor at an alternative cancer clinic being interviewed stated that three women under his care at that time for breast cancer had very often placed their cell phones either under the bra strap or in their bra and developed a tumor in that exact location! We may not know for sure that cell phones cause breast cancer, but it is relatively simple to put your cell phone elsewhere, away from your body.

  1. Use Meditation or Other Relaxation Techniques

It has long been known that prolonged periods of unmanaged stress can lead to diseases such as cancer. Nearly every one of my coaching clients tells me that they were under an extraordinary load of stress in the lead-up to their breast cancer diagnosis. Doctors tend to refute this, but science is starting to catch up and understand how cortisol, the main hormone that is released during periods of stress, can lead to disease such as breast cancer.

One of the best things you can teach your daughter is meditation. Children who learn how to meditate and relax deal more effectively with stress. They also learn how to live in the moment more often, how to distance themselves from stress and anxiety, and how to settle their minds, thus reducing cortisol levels and so much more. Again, this is about you leading by example because if your daughter still lives at home with you, she may be less likely to do this if she doesn’t see you doing it. If you don’t know how, perhaps you can learn and meditate together.

  1. Don’t Smoke and Don’t Drink Alcohol (or Keep it to a Minimum)

You’ve heard this before and it’s so important that it bears repeating. Both smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol puts you at a higher risk for breast cancer, other cancers, and heart disease. Smoking has been linked with increased cancer risk, especially if someone smokes regularly before their first child. If you or your daughter smokes and has trouble quitting, switch to American Spirit additive-free cigarettes. Even better and cheaper is to roll your own with non-toxic paper using organic tobacco. Even getting away from commercial cigarette brands is a huge step in the right direction.

Studies on alcohol have shown that compared with non-drinkers, people that have one alcoholic drink per day have a small increase in risk. However those who have two to five drinks daily increase their breast cancer risk by one-and-a-half times over those who do not drink alcohol.

  1. Avoid Birth Control Pills

Most doctors, after writing a prescription for birth control pills, likely don’t tell their patients, “you are increasing your risk of cancer”. Oral contraceptives increase a woman’s risk of certain cancers. In particular, cancers of the breast, cervix, and liver, says the National Cancer Institute’s own website. A recent study done with African American women revealed that oral contraceptive use increased the risk of estrogen-receptor positive, estrogen-receptor negative, and triple negative breast cancers. The risk declined after a woman stopped using oral contraceptives, but was still a causative factor for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer for up to 15-19 years after stopping, and even longer for estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer.

Breast Cancer Prevention Mother Daughter

Teaching Breast Cancer Prevention by Example

Simply understanding the factors that puts women at a higher risk for breast cancer is not enough. It’s critical for you to live by example and if you don’t know, then learn the breast cancer signs for yourself and teach them to your daughter. Encourage your daughter to be proactive with her health and not expect her doctor to take care of her because they either can’t or won’t.

Each one of us has our own responsibility to be properly informed about breast cancer prevention and websites such as The Truth About Cancer will give you trustworthy and accurate information you can follow. It’s now up to you to take  the necessary steps… both for your sake and for the women you love.

To read article on the Truth About Cancer Website, please click here.

Cancer Legal Resource Center | Disability Rights Legal Center

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Cancer Legal Resource Center (CLRC) provides information and education about cancer-related legal issues to the public through its national telephone assistance line. The CLRC also conducts national education and outreach programs for community groups, employers and healthcare professionals and is actively involved in community activities to raise public awareness of cancer-related legal and public policy issues.

A cancer diagnosis may carry with it a variety of legal issues, including insurance appeals, employment rights and leave time, access to health care and government benefits, and estate planning. These legal issues can cause people unnecessary worry, confusion, and stress, and can be overwhelming. When these legal issues are not addressed, people may find that although they have gotten through treatment, they have lost their homes, jobs, or insurance coverage.

While we recognize that it should not take legal resources to access health care, understand insurance options, or preserve one’s job, it frequently does.  When information is readily and easily accessible, we believe the quality of outcomes for patient survivorship improves and stress and anxiety decreases.

The CLRC is also committed to providing information and resources on cancer-related legal issues to health care professionals, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychosocial care providers, physicians assistants, patient navigators, patient advocates, and community health advocates. Ultimately, our goal is to train health care professionals to identify cancer-related legal issues and legal barriers to health care and provide health care professionals with resources to assist their patients navigate through cancer-related legal issues and provide appropriate referrals, which we believe will improve the quality of life of cancer survivors and caregivers.  For resources specifically for health care professionals, please click here.

To contact the CLRC, please call (866) THE-CLRC.

If you would like CLRC to participate in your next event or you would like us to send you materials, please click here.

 

Source: Cancer Legal Resource Center | Disability Rights Legal Center

Green Brings Cancer Fighting Laser to Morehouse School of Medicine

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MSM Gains Multi-disciplinary Physicist that Specializes in Nanobiophotonics and Targeted Cancer Therapeutics, Using Lasers, Nanoparticles and Antibodies

Contact:
Ronna Charles Nu’Man
rnuman@msm.edu
404-752-1717
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 18, 2016 – ATLANTA – Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) welcomes Hadiyah-Nicole Green, Ph.D. as assistant professor in the department of physiology. In addition to her faculty role, Green will continue work that developed from patent-pending technologies, including a 3-in-1 system for early detection, targeting, a selective treatment of malignant tumors, and a nanoparticle-enabled 10-minute laser treatment that induces 100% tumor regression. She was recently awarded a $1.1 million HBCU-Research Scientist Training Program Career Development Award from the Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development Service of the VA Office of Research and Development. Green will start at MSM on April 4, 2016.

“Dr. Green’s ground-breaking research is developing revolutionary technologies that could result in life-saving alternatives for people fighting cancer,” Sandra Harris-Hooker, Ph.D., vice president and executive dean or research and academic administration. “We welcome her diversity of thought to not only help in the education of the next generation of providers, but to partner with our community of researchers in the advancement of health equity.”

Green comes to MSM from Tuskegee University, where she served as an assistant professor in the department of physics with adjunct appointments in the departments of biological sciences and materials science engineering.  She is a multi-disciplinary physicist who specializes in nanobiophotonics and targeted cancer therapeutics, using lasers, nanoparticles, and antibodies to develop biomarker-specific platforms to target, image, and treat malignant tumors including head and neck and women’s cancers.

Green completed her bachelor of science in physics with a concentration in optics and minor in mathematics from Alabama A&M University in 1999. She received her master of science in physics with a concentration in Nanobiophotonics in 2009 and her Ph.D. in physics in 2012 from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). As a student, she received $300,000 in scholarships and fellowships, including the National Physical Science Consortium Fellowship, National Science Foundation Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship, David and Lucille Packard Foundation Fellowship and AAMU Presidential Scholarship.
About Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM)

Founded in 1975, MSM is among the nation’s leading educators of primary care physicians and was recognized by Annals of Internal Medicine in 2011 as the top institution in the first study of U.S. medical schools for our social mission based on our production of primary care physicians, training of underrepresented minority doctors and placement of doctors practicing in underserved communities. Our faculty and alumni are noted for excellence in teaching, research and public policy, as well as exceptional patient care.

Morehouse School of Medicine is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award doctorate and master degrees. For more information, please visit www.msm.edu

Giving in December for #GivingTuesday

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Tweet, Instagram @IWillSurviveInc and donate during #GivingTuesday and share why you give…we want to know! Thank you for your support! And do not forget to do your breast self exams this month.

Help us grant a wish on breast cancer pre-survivors and survivors wish lists this holiday!

One wish is to help pay medical bills after breast cancer treatments, another is a spa day, another is guitar lessons, another is a juicer, another is a car, another is a car that works, another is a massage to make the pain go away, another is reconstructive surgery, another is… the list is on and on- please help today!

http://www.IWillSurviveInc.org

Women’s History Month is March

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Take a wonderful woman to a beautiful fashion show fundraiser to show her your appreciate of all her hard work as a woman. Did you know women still only get paid .77 cents on the dollar. President Obama is trying to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act. We do not want to go on and on about politics on this blog but it is such a touchy subject still as we think about women’s history.

Let us bring it back to discuss this event. If you missed it last year, you do not want to miss it this year. The I Will Survive, Inc. Fashion Show on the Runway returns again and you should come out. Dress to impress or dress comfortably in style. You choose! At this fashion show you will get some motivation, some survivors, some fashion, some food, wonderful vendors, and live music. All for only $20 dollars on sale now until March 20th. Ticket sales are $40 dollars the door.

Tickets on sale for $20 at www.iwillsurviveinc.org Get yours today!

and Keep On Surviving,

~I Will Survive, Inc.

PO Box 81364Atlanta, GA 30366Phone (404) 483-8503 

Press Release

Contact: Anisa PalmerPhone: (404)483-8503 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE9 A.M. EDT, FEBRUARY 25, 2013

I Will Survive, Inc. Fundraiser on the Runway

Atlanta, GA, FEBRUARY 25, 2013:  Non profit organization, I Will Survive, Inc., founded by service disabled veteran, Anisa Palmer, will have the second annual fundraiser fashion show at the Melia Hotel located off 590 West Peachtree Street. NW Atlanta, GA 30308 on March 30th from 7:00 to 11:00 pm.

I Will Survive, Inc. will have the fundraiser on the runway with some of Atlanta’s hottest designers and talent. Some features will be Atlanta’s musical favorite Quinn and Jukebox, kidney survivor and remarkable painter, Tamara Natalie Madden, who is donating some of her pieces towards the silent auction. Other special guests include NFL Veteran, Ed Hartwell and Author and Motivation speaker, Jack A. Daniels, as guest speakers. Last but not least Comic Pierre Edwards will be hosting. The goal is to raise $10,000 from this event.

I Will Survive, Inc. is trying to acquire a building this year to help more survive and with a physical location, so much more can be done. Last year they were able to provide free mammograms and health screenings to individuals in need, provide additional financial assistance for individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, and provide educational awareness to the lesser-educated communities. All ticket sales go to providing funding for these programs.

I Will Survive, Inc.’s new logo has officially been launched as well and hopes that the communities will be able to better identify with its message of strength and the will to survive.

For more information on becoming a sponsor or vendor please email anisa.palmer@iwillsurviveinc.org for all other inquiries please email contact@iwillsurviveinc.org or visit the website at www.iwillsurviveinc.org. Free event to those diagnosed with breast cancer and breast cancer survivors. Show your support for a good time at Melia Hotel. Purchase tickets now on sale: http://www.iwillsurvivesignature2.eventbrite.com where all ticket sales goes towards funding the programs of I Will Survive, Inc.

-End-