A Night of Fashion!

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A Night of Fashion is an event you do not want to miss! Dress fashionable!

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You may have heard about the critical work we conduct at I Will Survive, Inc. If not, we are in approaching our 7th year of serving greater Atlanta area and putting on our annual charity event to raise $10,000 for our programs on Thursday, April 6, 2017 at the exquisite Callanwolde from 7:00pm to 9:30pm. We will include amazing local fashion designers, prevention education information, breast cancer resources, motivational speakers, fine art, incredible live music, a silent auction, delicious food, and drinks. Sponsors include the Fulton DeKalb Hospital Authority, Peach State Health Plan, I Care Atlanta, Unified Tech, Inc., Nationwide Soluntions, Inc. and more. Gift bag sponsors include Nekola Essentials, Livi Rae Lingerie, and more!

Silent Auction items include Macallan Rare Cask, Jack Daniels Sinatra Select, South African Safari, Tessa Marie Photography Sessions, Vixen Vodka Gift Basket, Shopping Spree’s, Luxury Dining Experiences, and more.

Actress Tangi Miller is your fabulous Host for the evening! Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole GreenDr. Diana Woodruffand Brenda Cobb are special Guest Speakers for the event. They will share their incredible stories and impact in our community on health. Recording Artist, Angelina Sherie is the featured artist for the event. Renee Knorr, international model and fashion guru, will host the fashion show portion of the event. You are in for an real treat!

The organization was founded in 2010 by military combat veteran, Anisa Palmer, who lost her mother to breast cancer. We provide economic support, prevention education, and health & wellness services to our community members affected by breast cancer.

Alarming facts: “One woman will die of breast cancer every 13 minutes in the U.S. and every 19 seconds, someone in the world is diagnosed with breast cancer.” Your contribution helps us in our life saving programs as we continue to “support the fighters” who are diagnosed with breast cancer and spread prevention tips and education to the communities. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Please reach the Executive Director, Anisa Palmer, for additional information if needed at Anisa.Palmer@IWillSurviveInc.org and be sure to visit us on the web and like our facebook page, connect with us on instagram, and follow us on twitter.#aNightofFashoin #IWillSurviveInc @IWillSurviveInc

We look forward to seeing you there and thank you for “supporting the fighters” of breast cancer.

Warmest regards,

Event Committee

http://www.IWillSurviveInc.org

Get tickets today! https://iwscharity2017.eventbrite.com

 

 

 

https://iwscharity2017.eventbrite.com

Anisa Palmer speaks with Health Professional Radio

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I like to have hot topic discussions to bring not only awareness of certain topics to people who may not get a chance to have the opportunity, to have that discussion, but to also increase my knowledge. I do not know everything. I learn from some of the youngest children I come in counter with when mentoring and I am honored.

What I really have a problem with is when people share misguided information or when they knowingly share misleading information. These people lose credibility fast for me, but for others, others that refuse to do their own research, tend to stay in the misguided path. A cloudy path or a path that never seems to be lighted with truth nor enlightened with logic.

Let us always seek knowledge. Let us always share knowledge and let us never forget, with knowledge comes power. Let us be reminded from the footsteps of great leaders and inspirational leaders around the world. Let us grow to continue to be coaches, mentors, leaders, inspirational people and more. Who is with me? This is a call to action. A call for change. A pledge to do better. To be better. Everyday. I am counting on you. Please count on me to do the same.

In Service,

Anisa Palmer

Founder/Executive Director

I Will Survive, Inc.

Review Finds Mammography’s Benefits Overplayed, Harms Dismissed

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To read article from original source(NPR): Click here

by NANCY SHUTE
April 01, 2014 4:42 PM ET
Talk to women here in the office, and it quickly becomes clear that we’re confused about what to do about mammograms. And no wonder.

Two months ago, a widely publicized Canadian study found that mammograms did not reduce breast cancer deaths, but that study was fiercely criticized by the nation’s radiologists as “incredibly flawed and misleading.”

A few weeks earlier, an analysis found that screening all women annually starting at age 40, as the American Cancer Society recommends, costs $6.5 billion more a year more than following the U.S. Preventive Service’s Task Force recommendation that women be screened every other year starting at age 50.

Now, the latest entries — two studies that try to put all the previous research on mammography’s harms and benefits in perspective.

Mammograms are a key screening tool for breast cancer. But critics say they’re not good enough. Shots – Health News Latest Evidence Against Mammograms Adds To Women’s Uncertainty First, researchers at Harvard took a broad look at all the research on mammograms since 1960 — more than 50 years of study. They also looked at evidence on the harms of false positives and overdiagnoses, in which a woman is treated for a cancer that would never have proved deadly. And they reviewed whether current efforts to try to personalize a woman’s cancer risk helped a woman figure out whether it was worth her while to get a mammogram.

Their conclusion: The benefits of mammography, though real, have been oversold, while the harms have been minimized.

A woman gets a mammogram in Putanges, France. Shots – Health News Sorting Out The Mammogram Debate: Who Should Get Screened When? Annual mammograms reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by about 19 percent, but the benefit varies widely based on a woman’s age and underlying cancer risk, the study found. For instance, about 1,904 women in their 40s would have to be screened to prevent one death, compared with just 377 women in their 60s.

That’s because breast cancer becomes much more common as a woman ages. At age 40, a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer in the next 10 years is 1.5 percent. At age 50, it’s 2.3 percent. And a 60-year-old has a 3.5 percent risk in the next decade.

The results were published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association.

Some of the money spent on annual mammograms might do more good if it went toward risk-based screening, a doctor says.
Shots – Health News Are We Paying $8 Billion Too Much For Mammograms?
The analysis found that about 19 percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer as a result of a mammogram are overdiagnosed — getting surgery, chemotherapy or radiation to treat a cancer that would never be life-threatening.

The bottom line, the researchers say, is that mammography is a less-than-perfect screening test, and doctors and patients need a lot more help figuring out if and when to use it.

“Decisions about mammography should involve discussion of risks, benefits, uncertainties, alternatives and patient preferences,” the authors write.

And women age 75 and older really need to consider whether they should be having mammograms at all, a second study in JAMA reports. As the researchers point out, there are no randomized controlled trials of mammography in women in that age group. So there’s no way to know how much they might extend a woman’s life.

So the harms of screening probably outweigh any benefits in women who will live for less than 10 years, the researchers say, and women who think they will live longer than that should talk with their doctors about the benefits and risks.