10 Ways to Balance Hormones Naturally

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By Dr. Axe

naturally balance hormones title

Hormones — such as estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline and insulin — are extremely important chemical messengers that affect many aspects of your overall health. Hormones are secreted by various glands and organs including your thyroid, adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, testicles and pancreas. The entire endocrine system works together to control the level of hormones circulating throughout your body, and if one or more is even even slightly imbalanced it can cause widespread, major health problems.

Conventional treatments for hormonal imbalances usually include synthetic hormone replacement therapies, birth control pills, insulin injections, thyroid medications and more. Unfortunately, for the majority of people suffering from hormonal disorders, relying on these types of synthetic treatments often does three things:

  1. It makes people dependent on taking prescription drugs for the rest of their lives in order to keep symptoms under control
  2. It simply masks the patient’s symptoms, but doesn’t solve them, which means that the patient can continue to develop abnormalities in other areas of the body while the disorder progresses
  3. It causes a higher risk for serious side effects such as stroke, osteoporosis, anxiety, reproductive problems, cancer and more

The good news is there are ways to balance your hormones naturally. Below you’ll learn what type of hormonal imbalance your specific symptoms might be pointing to, what the root causes of your hormonal problem are, and how you can help treat the problem without experiencing the negative side effects associated with synthetic treatments.


Signs & Symptoms of Hormonal Imbalances

Some of the most common signs and symptoms of hormone imbalances include:

  • Infertility and irregular periods
  • Weight gain or weight loss (that’s unexplained and not due to intentional changes in your diet)
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Low libido
  • Changes in appetite
  • Digestive issues
  • Hair loss and hair thinning

Symptoms of hormonal imbalances can range drastically depending on what type of disorder or illness they cause. For example, high estrogen can contribute to problems including endometriosis and reproductive issues, while symptoms of diabetes often include weight gain, changes in appetite, nerve damage, and problems with eyesight.

Some specific problems associated with some of the most common hormonal imbalances include:

  • Estrogen dominance: changes in sleep patterns, changes in weight and appetite, higher perceived stress, slowed metabolism
  • Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS): infertility, weight gain, higher risk for diabetes, acne, abnormal hair growth
  • Low estrogen: low sex drive, reproductive problems, menstrual irregularity, changes in mood
  • Hypothyroidism: slowed metabolism, weight gain, fatigue, anxiety, irritability, digestive issues, irregular periods
  • Low testosterone: erectile dysfunction, muscle loss, weight gain, fatigue, mood-related problems
  • Hyperthyroidism & Grave’s Disease: anxiety, thinning hair, weight loss, IBS, trouble sleeping, irregular heartbeats
  • Diabetes: weight gain, nerve damage (neuropathy), higher risk for vision loss, fatigue, trouble breathing, dry mouth, skin problems
  • Adrenal fatigue: fatigue, muscle aches and pains, anxiety and depression, trouble sleeping, brain fog, reproductive problems

Risk Factors & Causes of Hormonal Imbalances

Hormonal imbalances are multi-factorial disorders, meaning they are caused by a combination of factors such as your diet, medical history, genetics, stress levels and exposure to toxins from your environment. Some of the major contributors to hormonal imbalances include:

  • Food allergies and gut issues: An expanding field of new research shows that your gut health plays a significant role in hormone regulation. If you have leaky gut syndrome or a lack of beneficial probiotic bacteria lining your intestinal wall, your more susceptible to hormonal problems including diabetes and obesity. That’s because inflammation usually stems from your gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health (1)
  • Being overweight or obese
  • High levels of inflammation caused by a poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle
  • Genetic susceptibility
  • Toxicity (exposure to pesticides, toxins, viruses, cigarettes, excessive alcohol and harmful chemicals) (2)
  • High amount of stress, and a lack of enough sleep and rest

10 Ways to Balance Hormones Naturally

1. Eat Healthy Fats (Including Coconut Oil and Avocados)

Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss.

My four favorite sources of anti-inflammatory, healthy fats include: coconut oil, avocados, grass-fed butter and wild-caught salmon. Coconut oil uses are plentiful− for example coconut oil (or cream/milk) has natural anti-bacterial and fat-burning effects. Avocado benefits include improving heart health, lowering inflammation, controlling your appetite and contributing to your daily intake of fiber and nutrients such as potassum.  Salmon nutrition is also impressive: it’s one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to lower inflammation and help with cognitive functions.

2. Supplement with Adaptogen Herbs 

Adaptogen herbs are a unique class of healing plants that promote hormone balance and protection the body from a wide variety of diseases, including those caused by excess stress. In addition to boosting immune function and combating stress, research shows that various adapotogens — such as ashwagandha, medicinal mushrooms, rhodiola and holy basil — can:

  • Improve thyroid function (3)
  • Lower cholesterol naturally
  • Reduce anxiety and depression (4)
  • Reduce brain cell degeneration
  • Stabilize blood sugar and insulin levels (5)
  • Support adrenal gland functions (6)

3. Balance Your Intake of Omega-3 to Omega-6 Fats

Since the early 20th century, the use of refined vegetable oils and intake of omega-6 fatty acids in our diets have skyrocketed. Because people didn’t also boost their intake of omega-3 foods during this time period, the result has been drastically elevated omega-6 levels.  I’ve seen an onslaught of chronic diseases caused by inflammatoryprocesses literally take over our society, and a major reason why is because of very disproportionate fatty acids in the Western modern diet.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a large component of brain-cell membranes and are important for cell-to-cell communication in the brain. Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids help protect against hippocampal neuronal loss and reduce pro-inflammatory responses. (7) Research from Pennsylvania State University suggests that jumping from a ratio of 1:1 omega-3/omega-6s (the ratio our hunter-gather ancestors mostly enjoyed) to the astronomical ratio between 10:1 and 20:1 (omega-3/omega-6s) is one of the primary dietary factors causing many diseases in America. (8)

Here’s a rule of thumb: Be sure to steer clear from oils high in omega-6 fats (safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut), and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead (wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products). I want to also mention, there is a type of omega-6 fat you want to try and get in your diet called GLA. GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, and it’s also found in hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels.

4. Improve Gut Health & Heal Leaky Gut Syndrome

Leaky gut is a condition that not only affects your digestive tract, but also causes hormone issues. Gut problems have been found to trigger autoimmune reactions, including arthritis and thyroid disorders. (9) So what exactly is leaky gut syndrome?

When undigested food particles, like gluten for example, leak through your gut into your bloodstream, it causes disease-causing inflammation that impacts the entire body — especially glands like the thyroid which is very susceptible to heightened inflammation. Most people with leaky gut have an a deficiency of probiotics in their guts. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin.

Steer clear of the foods that can cause damage in your digestive system most, including: processed foods, gluten, hydrogenated oils and added sugar. The top foods and supplements that support healing leaky gut include: bone broth, kefir, fermented vegetables, and high-fiber foods like vegetables and sprouted seeds. In addition, supplements like digestive enzymes and probiotics can aid in repairing your gut lining,which in turn can balance your hormones.

5. Eliminate Toxic Kitchen, Beauty and Body Care Products

Another way to eliminate toxins in your body is to avoid conventional body care products that are made with potentially-harmful chemicals including DEA, parabens, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate. A better alternative is to use natural products made with ingredients like essential oils, coconut oil, shea butter and castor oil. The Environmental Working Group evaluated over 72,000 products and ranked them in an easy-to-understand guide to make sure you have a resource to keep your family safe. Check out EWG’s “Skin Deep Cosmetic Database” today for recommendations for which products to use and avoid.

Another thing to consider is your use of plastic bottles, aluminum cans and containers. It’s best to replace plastic and aluminum with glass and stainless steel because of the toxic effects of BPAAnother wise precaution is to switch from teflon pans to stainless steel, ceramic or cast iron, which can make a big difference in the amount of chemicals making their way into the food you prepare.

6. Exercise (Especially Interval Training)

One of the best all-around activities you can do for your health is high intensity interval training (HIIT) − including one of my favorite types called burst training. If there is a silver bullet out there to help with a sluggish metabolism, weight gain and other issues, this just might be it! Exercise in general is great for balancing hormones because it reduces inflammation, can help you maintain a healthy weight, lowers stress, helps regulate your appetite, and aids in getting better sleep.

Whether we’re talking about endorphins from a “runner’s high”, testosterone, growth hormone or insulin, HIIT and burst training can help your body regulate production and use of these hormones. Exercise can also enhance your immune system, allow your cells to take up more glucose (which lowers insulin), protect you from depression, and keep you more alert without the need for caffeine.

According to the University of Notre Dame Medical School in Sydney, “HIT is associated with increased patient compliance and improved cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes and is suitable for implementation in both healthy and ‘at risk’ populations”. (10)  For people with hormonal imbalances, the key with exercise is to be careful not to overdo it. Training for a shorter period of time (about 20 minutes three times a week) but with higher intensity works well for most people who can’t afford to add any extra stress to their system. Keep in mind that optimal exercise can differ a lot from person to person however, so it’s a good idea to seek advise from a processional if you’re ever unsure.

7. Reduce Stress & Get More Sleep

Unless you get 7-8 hours of sleep every night, you’re doing your body no favors. A lack of sleep or disturbing your natural circadian rhythm can be one of the worst habits contributing to a hormone imbalance. How so? Because your hormones work on a schedule! Case in point: Cortisol, the primary “stress hormone”, is regulated at midnight. Therefore, people who go to bed late never truly get a break from their sympathetic flight/fight stress response.

A lack of sleep, long-term use of corticosteroids and chronic stress are three of the biggest contributors to high cortisol levels. A report published in the Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism stated that “Stress can lead to changes in the serum level of many hormones including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone and prolactin”. (11)

Sleep helps keep stress hormones balanced, builds energy and allows the body to recover properly. Excessive stress and poor sleep are linked with higher levels of morning cortisol, decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. To maximize hormone function, ideally try to get to bed by 10 p.m and stick with a regular sleep-wake-cycle as much as possible.

8. Watch Your Caffeine & Alcohol Intake

Caffeine in moderate amounts might be okay for some people, but drinking too much caffeine is almost as bad as not getting enough sleep. Caffeine, which can stay in your system for up to six hours, is a chemical that affects the central nervous system (CNS) and raises your heart rate, increases alertness, and changes the way your brain produces hormones. Although caffeine overdoses are rare, caffeine is capable of elevating cortisol levels if it interferes with your normal sleep cycle. It might also have an impact on other stress hormones, such as adrenaline production. You’re probably aware that caffeine is addictive by nature, increases nervousness and anxiety in many people, and is linked with insomnia.

If you need a little boost during the day, try not to drink more than one–two cups. Ideally you’ll turn to matcha green tea or tulsi tea which are much lower in caffeine. The good news is that once you’re health is back on track, small amounts of caffeine can usuallyu be toleraable, and even beneficial. Dartmouth Medical School reports that “caffeine has been shown to increase insulin levels, reduce insulin sensitivity, and increase cortisol levels. However, epidemiological studies have indicated that long-term consumption of beverages containing caffeine such as coffee and green tea is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus”. (12)

Another important step is to watch your alcohol intake, since high levels of alcohol (above about 2-3 drinks daily) can negatively impact liver functioning. Chronic alcohol consumption can contribute to estrogen dominance and has been found to interfere with pancreatic functioning, increase liver disease risk, lower testosterone and contribute to anxiety and malnutrition. The liver is very important for hormonal balance and has over 500 different functions in the body! Of course it’s extremely important to quit smoking too. Studies have found that smoking interferes with normal immunological and reproductive processes. Compared with nonsmokers, moderate to heavy smokers (≥ 10 cigarettes/day) have abnormal levels of steroid metabolites and reproductive hormones that can be up to 35 percent higher than usual.  (13)

9. Supplement with Vitamin D3

According to an article from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vitamin D3’s role in promoting health is more profound than previously suspected. Researchers found that vitamin D has an impact in the following ways: (14)

It affects “the adaptive immune system, the innate immune system, insulin secretion by the pancreatic β cell, multifactorial heart functioning and blood pressure regulation, and brain and fetal development.” 

Vitamin D almost acts like a hormone inside the body and has important implications for keeping inflammation levels low. This is why people who live in dark areas often suffer from seasonal depression and other health problems unless they supplement with vitamin D. Sunshine is really the best way to optimize vitamin D levels because your bare skin actually makes vitamin D on its own when exposed to even small amounts of direct sunlight. Most people should supplement with around 2,000 IU to 5,000 IU daily of vitamin D3 if they live in dark areas, during the winter, and on days when they’re not in the sun.

10. Back Off Birth Control Pills

In simplest terms, “the pill” is a type of hormone therapy that raises estrogen levels to such dangerous levels that it can cause many complications. I cannot urge you strongly enough to stop using the pill immediately, especially considering that there are many other (safer) ways to prevent pregnancy. My thoughts on taking the pill can be summed up this way: Just say no to birth control pills! Studies show that the risks of taking them, especially long-term, can include: (15)

  • Breakthrough bleeding between cycles
  • Increased risk of breast cancer
  • Increased risk of uterine bleeding, blood clotting, heart attack and stroke
  • Migraines
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Weight gain
  • Back pains
  • Mood changes
  • Nausea
  • Benign liver tumors
  • Breast tenderness

Precautions When Treating Hormonal Imbalances

In some cases, synthetic hormonal treatments (such as insulin or thyroid medication) will be necessary to treat a hormonal imbalance. However the majority of people can feel a lot better by making the lifestyle changes described above.

For people with diagnosed hormonal disorders− including type 1 or type 2 diabetes, Adrenal Insufficiency, Addison’s Disease, Graves’s Disease and Cushing’s Syndrome for example− it’s always important to speak with your doctor before discontinuing medication use. The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision. Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.


Final Thoughts on Hormonal Imbalances:

  • Hormonal imbalances affect many millions of people worldwide, in the forms of common disorders like diabetes, thyroid disorders, menstrual irregularities, infertility, low testosterone and estrogen dominance
  • Symptoms include feeling anxious, tired, irritable, gaining or losing weight, not sleeping well and noticing changes in your sex drive, focus and appetite
  • Causes for hormonal imbalances include poor gut health, inflammation, high amounts of stress, genetic susceptibility, and toxicity
  • Natural treatments include eating an anti-inflammatory diet, consuming enough omega-3s, getting good sleep, exercising and controlling stress

Read Original Article: https://draxe.com/10-ways-balance-hormones-naturally/

 

Green Brings Cancer Fighting Laser to Morehouse School of Medicine

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MSM Gains Multi-disciplinary Physicist that Specializes in Nanobiophotonics and Targeted Cancer Therapeutics, Using Lasers, Nanoparticles and Antibodies

Contact:
Ronna Charles Nu’Man
rnuman@msm.edu
404-752-1717
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 18, 2016 – ATLANTA – Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) welcomes Hadiyah-Nicole Green, Ph.D. as assistant professor in the department of physiology. In addition to her faculty role, Green will continue work that developed from patent-pending technologies, including a 3-in-1 system for early detection, targeting, a selective treatment of malignant tumors, and a nanoparticle-enabled 10-minute laser treatment that induces 100% tumor regression. She was recently awarded a $1.1 million HBCU-Research Scientist Training Program Career Development Award from the Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development Service of the VA Office of Research and Development. Green will start at MSM on April 4, 2016.

“Dr. Green’s ground-breaking research is developing revolutionary technologies that could result in life-saving alternatives for people fighting cancer,” Sandra Harris-Hooker, Ph.D., vice president and executive dean or research and academic administration. “We welcome her diversity of thought to not only help in the education of the next generation of providers, but to partner with our community of researchers in the advancement of health equity.”

Green comes to MSM from Tuskegee University, where she served as an assistant professor in the department of physics with adjunct appointments in the departments of biological sciences and materials science engineering.  She is a multi-disciplinary physicist who specializes in nanobiophotonics and targeted cancer therapeutics, using lasers, nanoparticles, and antibodies to develop biomarker-specific platforms to target, image, and treat malignant tumors including head and neck and women’s cancers.

Green completed her bachelor of science in physics with a concentration in optics and minor in mathematics from Alabama A&M University in 1999. She received her master of science in physics with a concentration in Nanobiophotonics in 2009 and her Ph.D. in physics in 2012 from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). As a student, she received $300,000 in scholarships and fellowships, including the National Physical Science Consortium Fellowship, National Science Foundation Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship, David and Lucille Packard Foundation Fellowship and AAMU Presidential Scholarship.
About Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM)

Founded in 1975, MSM is among the nation’s leading educators of primary care physicians and was recognized by Annals of Internal Medicine in 2011 as the top institution in the first study of U.S. medical schools for our social mission based on our production of primary care physicians, training of underrepresented minority doctors and placement of doctors practicing in underserved communities. Our faculty and alumni are noted for excellence in teaching, research and public policy, as well as exceptional patient care.

Morehouse School of Medicine is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award doctorate and master degrees. For more information, please visit www.msm.edu

IWS Health Education Workshop Series

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Pink Ribbon

IWS

Presents the 2016

Health Education Workshop Series

2nd Friday of every Month

5:00pm – 6:00pm

 at I Will Survive, Inc.

5879- D New Peachtree Rd. Doraville, GA 30340

Free with RSVP

www.IWillSurviveInc.org

_____________________________________

 Feb 12, 2016 – Breast Health: “Health & Wealth of it all”

Bra fitting with Livi Rea Lingerie, food, watch a Pink Ribbons clip from the documentary, goody bags, and survivor network

Mar 11, 2016 – Health & Beauty: “Pretty” in Pink

Massages, food, wheat grass shots, goody bags, and survivor network

April 8, 2016 – Love Self: “Expressions: The Soul of a Survivor”

Spoken word therapy, laughter, food, goody bags, and survivor network

Serve as a Fellow with I Will Survive, Inc.

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Military

Through the Mission Continues’ Fellowship Program, selected veterans volunteer part-time for six months with I Will Survive, Inc. In return, Fellows receive a living stipend, complete a leadership development curriculum and develop new skills and networks. The Fellowship Program is ideal for veterans looking to start a new career, gain practical work experience while attending school or for a new way to serve at home. Find out more at www.MissionContinues.org (open to post-9/11 veterans)

Need: Honorable Discharge, DD214, Clean Criminal Record, and signed Memorandum of Understanding.

  • Attend a three-day fellowship orientation (coming up in Atlanta).
  • Gain additional leadership skills as a civilian.
  • Transfer military skills to the civilian workforce.
  • Gain public speaking skills.
  • Obtain networks for future careers after the fellowship.
  • Become active citizens in the community.
  • Gain mentorship and coaching from a Certified Professional Life Coach free of charge.
  • Work directly with the Executive Director of I Will Survive, Inc., who is also a veteran who served two tours in Iraq, obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communications and will obtain a Masters in Public Administration.

Please visit the host organization at www.IWillSurviveInc.org to gain more information. Email contact@iwillsurviveinc.org if you are interested to serve again!

“The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” – Mahatma Gandhi

I Will Survive, Inc. 5879 New Peachtree Rd., Suite D., Atlanta, GA 30340

Phone 404.483.8503 Fax 800.880.1586

“April Showers Bring May Flowers”

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amazingdesigns.comImage credit: amazingdesigns.com

Transitioning from April to May was great for I Will Survive, Inc. We had our amazing #IWSribboncuttingceremony on April 18, 2015 and Mayor Pittman proclaimed the day to now be known as the “I Will Survive” day. What an honor to all those who are battling breast cancer and all those who survived. Mothers, fathers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, brothers, daughters, sons… a special moment to honor those who lost the fight against breast cancer as well. Karen Palmer, was born on April 18, 1952 and gave birth to 5 children before the tender age of 38 when she had a final lung failure due to the malignant tumor spreading.

Rain was in the forecast and our new building (donated for one year) was not large enough to bring everyone inside for the ceremony. We opened with Pastor Cail and the rain moved out of the clouds. God shed light through the rays of the sun and the gloomy day became bright. It was a joyous day. $523 dollars was raised to help fund our programs and we hope to have our Office Manager and Receptionist hired soon to help us run our programs out of a building we can now call home.

Show your mothers love, not only on Mother’s day coming up, but cherish them everyday. We do not know how long they have on this earth. Kiss them, hug them, tell them that you love them, and appreciate them. For I, Anisa Palmer, founder of I Will Survive, Inc., nonprofit organization for breast cancer awareness through education and funding in lower-income communities, wish that I spent more time doing that in the short amount of years that I had my dear mother, Karen Palmer, by my side.

And rain on our future mothers so they can blossom into magnificent women. Inspire them to be community leaders and women of virtue. Give them knowledge to help them succeed. Mentor them. Teach them. Lead them. And support them as we continue to “Support the Fighters”.

Famous Latinas Who Survived- Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month

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National Hispanic Heritage Month is the period from September 15 to October 15 in the United States, when people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States and celebrate the group’s heritage and culture. Since it is also National Breast Cancer Awareness Month all of October- we know it is a must for us to Celebrate the Survivors below!!!

Original article written by Veronique De Miguel in 2012

Former_Miss_Venezuela_Eva_Ekvall_07

Former Miss Venezuela, Eva Ekvall, lost the fight to breast cancer at age 28 leaving a daughter behind.

Cancer does not discriminate. Actresses, models, singers, beauty queens, television personalities…the list of celebrities who have battled cancer always seems too long. For Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we honor those famous Latinas who’ve battled the disease. Some have won and some have lost; others are still engaged in the fight.

FAMOUS FIGHTERS

After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005, Puerto Rican actress Adamari Lopez, then 33, underwent surgery and chemotherapy. She is in remission and still undergoing maintenance treatment.

Bárbara Mori, the Mexico-Uruguayan actress protagonist of the film Insignificant Things underwent treatment for breast cancer when she was only 29 years old. She appeared in the 2010 documentary 1 a Minute, with celebrity cancer survivors Olivia Newton John and Kelly McGillis, among others.

Ana Maria Polo, famous for her television program Closed Case, was 46 years old when she had a mastectomy. She celebrates that date like her second birthday, because the breast cancer was detected in time. Now, as a survivor, she untiringly campaigns throughout Latin America and the United States to promote breast cancer awareness.

Mexican actress Lorena Rojas became a spokeswoman for Lance Armstrong’s LiveStrong Foundation after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008, at 36. The cancer was then at its initial stage, and her treatment was deemed a success. The press leaked news of Rojas’ second diagnosis earlier this year, allegedly before the actress was ready to disclose the information.

Daniela Romo managed to overcome breast cancer after several chemotherapy treatments, and shed her famous long locks as a result of chemo. She has publicly shown her support for friend Lorena Rojas.

Mexican actress Patricia Reyes Spindola shared with her fans that she had breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. On a video on her YouTube page, the famous actress explains how she found out the news, faced the disease and what the experience has taught her.

One of the most recent and well-publicized breast cancer diagnoses in Spain was that of President of the Community of Madrid, Esperanza Aguirre. She had surgery in 2011, and in September of 2012, resigned from her political post. Though she stated that she resigned to “spend more time with family,” speculation is widespread that concerns about her cancer led her to resign.

Remembering Maya Angelou as we seek New PR Team

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MayaAngelou

We are building a new PR Team- public relations volunteers, business owners willing to donate their time and services for a tax deduction, or interns seeking to gain experience in the nonprofit sector. Please share and send them our way. http://www.IWillSurviveInc.org

“You can only become truly accomplished at something you love. Don’t make money your goal. Instead pursue the things you love doing and then do them so well that people can’t take their eyes off of you.” ― Maya Angelou

Next big event on our calendar to market:

Monday September 8th, 2014 from 8:15am – 4:00pm
Hilton Atlanta NorthEast
5993 Peachtree Industrial Blvd.
Norcross, GA 30092

Meet the Legacy Award Honorees for Atlanta 2014 – Scarlett and JT Lewis, Monica Pearson, Anisa Palmer, and Paris Murphy!!! http://www.liveyourlegacysummit.com