IWS Health Education Workshop Series

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Pink Ribbon

IWS

Presents the 2016

Health Education Workshop Series

2nd Friday of every Month

5:00pm – 6:00pm

 at I Will Survive, Inc.

5879- D New Peachtree Rd. Doraville, GA 30340

Free with RSVP

www.IWillSurviveInc.org

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 Feb 12, 2016 – Breast Health: “Health & Wealth of it all”

Bra fitting with Livi Rea Lingerie, food, watch a Pink Ribbons clip from the documentary, goody bags, and survivor network

Mar 11, 2016 – Health & Beauty: “Pretty” in Pink

Massages, food, wheat grass shots, goody bags, and survivor network

April 8, 2016 – Love Self: “Expressions: The Soul of a Survivor”

Spoken word therapy, laughter, food, goody bags, and survivor network

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Serve as a Fellow with I Will Survive, Inc.

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Military

Through the Mission Continues’ Fellowship Program, selected veterans volunteer part-time for six months with I Will Survive, Inc. In return, Fellows receive a living stipend, complete a leadership development curriculum and develop new skills and networks. The Fellowship Program is ideal for veterans looking to start a new career, gain practical work experience while attending school or for a new way to serve at home. Find out more at www.MissionContinues.org (open to post-9/11 veterans)

Need: Honorable Discharge, DD214, Clean Criminal Record, and signed Memorandum of Understanding.

  • Attend a three-day fellowship orientation (coming up in Atlanta).
  • Gain additional leadership skills as a civilian.
  • Transfer military skills to the civilian workforce.
  • Gain public speaking skills.
  • Obtain networks for future careers after the fellowship.
  • Become active citizens in the community.
  • Gain mentorship and coaching from a Certified Professional Life Coach free of charge.
  • Work directly with the Executive Director of I Will Survive, Inc., who is also a veteran who served two tours in Iraq, obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communications and will obtain a Masters in Public Administration.

Please visit the host organization at www.IWillSurviveInc.org to gain more information. Email contact@iwillsurviveinc.org if you are interested to serve again!

“The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” – Mahatma Gandhi

I Will Survive, Inc. 5879 New Peachtree Rd., Suite D., Atlanta, GA 30340

Phone 404.483.8503 Fax 800.880.1586

12 Foods for Breast Cancer Prevention

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Image Credit: tnphtc.org

By Madeline Vann, MPH | Medically reviewed by Niya Jones, MD, MPH

A healthy diet isn’t a magic bullet against cancer, but new research suggests it may help. Two studies just released by the University of California, San Diego, and the Genesis Prevention Center at University Hospital in South Manchester, England, show that a meal plan rich in fruits and veggies and low in starchy carbohydrates may help prevent breast cancer and breast cancer recurrence.

In fact, diet may even play a greater role than weight management in breast cancer prevention. “Overweight women who exercise 150 minutes a week and eat lots of fruits and veggies have a lower risk of breast cancer than normal-weight women who are sedentary and have a low intake of fruits and veggies,” says nutritionist Mary Marian, MS, RD, CSO, a research specialist and lecturer at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson. She recommends careful shopping in the produce section, seafood department, and spice aisle to help you create an anti-cancer nutrition plan. The following foods, in particular, may offer nutrients that promote better breast health and boost your immune system.

The spice that gives curry its beautiful yellow color contains a chemical called churchmen. (Insert: also known as tumeric, an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant in the ginger family). Lab studies using churchmen supplements have shown that it could play a role in helping fight breast cancer tumors when combined with certain drug-based therapy. It also may have an anti-inflammatory effect that could protect your overall health. You’ll need supplements to get enough curcumin, but putting a veggie curry full of broccoli, onions, and garlic on your breast cancer prevention menu could help make your anti-cancer nutrition plan more fun.

Broccoli has garnered the most attention as a breast cancer prevention food. Research has shown it blocks tumor growth, explains Marian, preventing the further spread of cancer if it does occur. You can also get this anti-cancer benefit from other cruciferous veggies, including cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and kale — but you most likely need to eat one or more of these vegetables every day, she advises.

“Garlic seems to have an impact on cell cycling,” explains Marian. That’s the process by which a normal, healthy cell might become cancerous. Credit for regulating this goes to the component of garlic called allyl sulfide. Allyl sulfides are found throughout the onion family, so adding garlic or onions to your recipes on a regular basis may aid in breast cancer prevention. Keep in mind, though, that anti-cancer nutrition studies have largely been done on garlic extract supplements rather than on garlic used for cooking. Also, people on blood thinners and certain other medications should talk with their doctor before taking garlic supplements to avoid possible drug interactions.

An apple a day may keep breast cancer away — but there’s a catch. If you normally peel your apple and toss away the colorful wrapping, you’re also tossing away a rich source of antioxidants, fiber, and other compounds needed for anti-cancer nutrition. Lab studies show that apple peel can actually fight the spread of cancer cells. The good news is that you don’t need exotic varieties — this research came from readily available Gala apples, so add them to your breast cancer prevention shopping list.

Research into the role of pomegranates is in its early stages, but Marian says a cell culture study suggests that the fruit contains a compound that might help fight cancer’s growth — especially estrogen-dependent cancers. Pomegranates make a delicious and healthy addition to any breast cancer management plan or breast cancer prevention diet, in either fruit or juice form. Adding them to your grocery list may benefit others in your family, too — they also help fight heart disease and prostate cancer.

Get out your nut cracker! Walnuts contain many helpful nutrients and healthy omega-3 fatty acids, which help your body fight inflammation. Research also suggests that walnuts may actually slow the growth of breast cancer tumors, so this tasty nut could play a role in breast cancer management even after diagnosis.

Other great sources of omega-3 fatty acids include certain fish and fish oil. “You really want to take fish oils on a daily basis,” Marian recommends. Fish is also a smart lean protein source and a great addition to a breast cancer prevention plan, because anti-cancer nutrition recommendations include limiting your intake of red meat and processed meats, such as bacon and packaged deli meats. Opt for salmon, mackerel, sea bass, and tuna as breast cancer diet choices instead.

Shopping for healthy fats will inevitably lead you to flaxseed oil, but this is an instance where your best anti-cancer nutrition choice is the seed itself, ground into a flour-like dust. “When you use milled flaxseed, it has a component called lignans,” explains Marian. Lignans may actually decrease cancer growth, making it perfect for a breast cancer management diet. You can buy ground flaxseed or grind the seeds yourself using a coffee grinder. Then sprinkle the flaxseed on salads.

Soy has received mixed reviews regarding adult breast cancer prevention, but Marian says mothers may be interested to know that when preteen girls eat two servings of soybean products a day, they reap anti-cancer nutrition benefits later in life. On the other hand, she recommends against adult women taking soy or isoflavone supplements as part of a breast cancer diet — these products contain estrogen-like compounds, which could prove to be too much of a good thing.

When it comes to breast cancer prevention, think about eating more carrots, cantaloupe, and sweet potatoes — foods rich in the form of vitamin A known as carotenoids. Women who have higher levels of carotenoids in their bloodstream seem to be at lower risk for breast cancer, says Marian. Orange vegetables and fruits are most often held up as sources of this powerful compound for breast cancer prevention, but “there are 600 different carotenoids,” she says. If you want to amp up the carotenoids in your breast cancer diet, just make sure you get lots of orange, red, yellow, and even dark green foods.

Blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries add color, variety, and flavor to your anti-cancer nutrition plan. They are also power-packed with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that can aid in breast cancer prevention, so make them part of your breast cancer diet. Recent research suggests that blueberries, in particular, play a role in breast cancer management by enhancing the effect of the often-prescribed drug tamoxifen in fighting breast cancer cells.

Green tea and white tea both contain catechins, extracts that seem to show some benefit in breast cancer prevention. Research suggests that green tea is particularly effective at protecting your cells against environmental exposures that might increase the risk for cancer. However, says Marian, you might have to drink a lot of tea — four or more cups a day — to achieve this effect.

To read the full article click here: http://www.everydayhealth.com/breast-cancer-pictures/foods-for-breast-cancer-prevention.aspx

“April Showers Bring May Flowers”

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amazingdesigns.comImage credit: amazingdesigns.com

Transitioning from April to May was great for I Will Survive, Inc. We had our amazing #IWSribboncuttingceremony on April 18, 2015 and Mayor Pittman proclaimed the day to now be known as the “I Will Survive” day. What an honor to all those who are battling breast cancer and all those who survived. Mothers, fathers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, brothers, daughters, sons… a special moment to honor those who lost the fight against breast cancer as well. Karen Palmer, was born on April 18, 1952 and gave birth to 5 children before the tender age of 38 when she had a final lung failure due to the malignant tumor spreading.

Rain was in the forecast and our new building (donated for one year) was not large enough to bring everyone inside for the ceremony. We opened with Pastor Cail and the rain moved out of the clouds. God shed light through the rays of the sun and the gloomy day became bright. It was a joyous day. $523 dollars was raised to help fund our programs and we hope to have our Office Manager and Receptionist hired soon to help us run our programs out of a building we can now call home.

Show your mothers love, not only on Mother’s day coming up, but cherish them everyday. We do not know how long they have on this earth. Kiss them, hug them, tell them that you love them, and appreciate them. For I, Anisa Palmer, founder of I Will Survive, Inc., nonprofit organization for breast cancer awareness through education and funding in lower-income communities, wish that I spent more time doing that in the short amount of years that I had my dear mother, Karen Palmer, by my side.

And rain on our future mothers so they can blossom into magnificent women. Inspire them to be community leaders and women of virtue. Give them knowledge to help them succeed. Mentor them. Teach them. Lead them. And support them as we continue to “Support the Fighters”.

Diet & Exercise…There’s an App for That! #REPOST

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Submitted for: Dr. Deborah German, vice president for medical affairs, dean, UCF College of Medicine

Subject: Weekly Health Tip From The UCF College of Medicine

Diet & Exercise…There’s an App for That!

Smartphones have given us the ability to control much of our lives from a single device. So why not manage our health there, too?

According to Google, health and fitness has been the year’s fastest growing app category, with top download categories including “healthy eating,” “fitness/training” and “calorie counters.”

Certainly thousands of health and fitness apps exist, but it raises the big question: Do these apps really benefit the user? Answer: It depends.

A study conducted by the University of Massachusetts found that most apps are useful for planning and calculating nutrition, but they don’t help you change your behavior because they lack strategies for ways to help you “stick with” your healthy habits.

When you’re evaluating potential health apps, consider the following questions:

*       Can I personalize my app? If you cannot input data like height, weight, age, sex and exercise intensity level, then its recommendations will likely be off-target.

*     Does it utilize my phone’s features? The best apps tend to rely heavily on the phone’s built-in functions and features. For example, an exercise app might use your GPS and accelerometer to track your workout.

*       Is it connected to other apps? Since fitness isn’t about a single variable, the app shouldn’t be either. Consider apps that tie into others focused on diet, exercise, sleep, etc.

*       What are users saying? Read online user reviews and look for trends. If you discover that several people are saying the same things-good or bad-the likelihood that your experience will be similar is high.

*       Is it social? Many people find the ability to report progress on social networks like Facebook to be a great source of encouragement. You any even discover new support systems among your online friends.

Ultimately, to change your behavior you need to use apps-and all technology for that matter-in the right way. If you’re spending hours focused on your data, you’re probably not moving. You’re stuck behind a computer. Instead, use technology to help you keep accurate track of what you’re eating or how many miles you walk. Then use that data to set new, healthier goals.

UCF Health Medical Director, Dr. Maria Cannarozzi, often recommends My Fitness Pal to her patients. She likes it because it shows how many calories you’re putting in your mouth every day so you can make better food choices-and it’s free.

Like anything, it’s easy to get addicted to new toys like apps. Mary E. Pritchard, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Psychology at Boise State University, says you are in dangerous mental health waters if you find that not using your app gives you anxiety or withdrawal; you are spending more time using your app than you want to or intended; or you choose working with technology over other social activities.

The bottom line is to know your body and yourself. If a fitness app helps keep your exercise program on track, then go for it. However, remember that an app cannot improve your health and wellness until you make basic behavioral modifications like eating more nutritional foods and getting a recommended amount of exercise. Use technology to help you do what you can’t do on your own, like accurately count carbs or calories, to improve your overall health.

Weekly Health Tips are brought to you by UCF Health (formerly UCF Pegasus Health), the College of Medicine’s physician practice. UCF Health includes primary care doctors and specialists who treat patients age 16 and up from across the community and accept most major insurance plans. If you or someone you know needs medical care, call (407) 266-DOCS or visit UCFHealth.com for more information. Coming in March – UCF Health will open a second location in Lake Nona’s Medical City. Stay tuned for more details.

Back to Basics for Good Nutrition and Health #Repost

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Submitted for: Dr. Deborah German, vice president for medical affairs, dean, UCF College of Medicine

Subject: Weekly Health Tip From The UCF College of Medicine

Back to Basics for Good Nutrition and Health

Medical evidence suggests that 50 to 75 percent of suffering can be eliminated with a healthy diet. In fact, good nutrition can help those suffering with diseases like arthritis, boost your overall mood and outlook on life, and even improve your quality of sleep. However, there’s so much conflicting information about food that it’s hard to know what to eat these days.

When it comes to nutrition, it’s important to get back to basics:

*       Drink at least 64 ounces of water per day. This is essential for proper metabolism and optimal body function.

*       Include at least 25 to 30 grams of fiber in your diet daily.

*       Include about 46 to 56 grams of protein in your diet daily; more if you’re very active.

*       Incorporate resistant starches (healthy carbohydrates) like beans, brown rice and garbanzo beans, which serve to boost metabolism and burn fat.

While “superfoods” have been in the media lately, there is no medical definition. However, it has come to represent a category of foods that possess superior nutritional properties-from antioxidants and anti-inflammatories to cancer inhibitors and blood sugar regulators. Some of the “tried and true” superfoods to incorporate into your diet include:

*       Leafy greens and crucifers (broccoli, Brussel sprouts, spinach, kale and collards)

*       Nuts (walnuts, almonds and pistachios)

*       Legumes (peanuts, lentils, black beans and garbanzo beans)

*       Whole grains (oats, brown rice and whole barley)

*       Super starches (sweet potatoes)

*       Fatty, cold-water fish (salmon, herring and sardines)

*       Fruits (berries, avocados, tomatoes, pears, grapefruit and bananas)

*       Tea (green and black varieties)

*       Dairy (Greek yogurt and eggs)

*       Other (pumpkin, beets, dark chocolate, cinnamon and soy)

There are several “trendy” superfoods getting lots of attention like nutrient-rich quinoa, which is packed with iron and is a nice balance of carbohydrates and proteins. Quinoa is almost like a balanced meal in itself. And since most American diets are deficit in protein, chia seeds and hemp seeds provide simple solutions. They can easily be added to soups, salads and cereals for an instant boost.

Regardless of your diet, nothing can replace healthy living… Eliminate all tobacco products; only consume alcohol in moderation; participate in 30 minutes of physical activity at least five times a week; get the appropriate amounts of sleep for your age; take time out for mindfulness, meditation and deep breathing; enjoy leisure and relaxation activities on a regular basis; and remain social.

Interested in learning more about how nutrition affects your heart health? UCF Health cardiologist Dr. Bernard Gros is offering a free seminar February 23 at 6:30 p.m. called “Your Healthy Heart: From Diet to Statins.” The seminar will be held at UCF Health, 3400 Quadrangle Blvd. Orlando, FL 32817. Space is limited, so registration is required. For more information and to register, visit www.ucfhealth.com

Weekly Health Tips are brought to you by UCF Health (formerly UCF Pegasus Health), the College of Medicine’s physician practice. UCF Health includes primary care doctors and specialists who treat patients age 16 and up from across the community and accept most major insurance plans. If you or someone you know needs medical care, call (407) 266-DOCS or visit UCFHealth.com for more information. Coming in March – UCF Health will open a second location in Lake Nona’s Medical City. Stay tuned for more details.

Happy New Year!

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New Year’s Resolutions: Goal Setting
by Philip Ross

1. Become a better time manager.

2. Manage your debt.

3. Go back to school.

4. Make an effort with co-workers.

5. Be more mindful.

6. Be a better listener.

7. Quit smoking.

8. Log in some volunteer hours. (with I Will Survive, Inc. 🙂

9. Reconnect with estranged family and friends.

10. Eat better.

11. Try new foods.

12. Get enough sleep.

13. Make time for exercise.
(Join Team Survive on January 17th)

14. Take a trip.

15. Be kind to yourself.

To read the full article click here

http://www.IWillSurviveInc.org